The Cost of Adoption

167Haiti Searching for Mom

Source: Tony Witton, Associated Press.

“I gained an education, I was able to attend private school, I’m a college graduate, I have my master’s degree, I am a teacher. I have two beautiful children. I have a husband,” she said. “And I lost my family…I never had that choice, but that’s what I did.”

Article (re)defined by GT.

Summary:

Haiti has had a long history that raises numerous questions around the area of adoption. Mariette Williams’ story is a prime example of why there’s so many questions on this issues. Williams who lived in a Haitian orphanage and was adopted by a Canadian couple in the 1980’s goes on a quest to find her birth family after 30 years and discovers the hidden truths about her adoption and life before moving to the U.S.

Comments:

There are so many issues with this story that I don’t even know where to begin. According to Ben Fox, from the Associated Press, in her quest to find her birth family, Williams discovered that her birth mother didn’t actually consent to giving up her daughter for adoption. In fact, she didn’t even know that a family had come to take her daughter away to the United States until she arrived at the orphanage and found that her daughter had disappeared. Stories like this used to happen too often in Haiti, until after the 2010 earthquake when the government decided to tighten their protocol for adoptions. Continue reading

Haiti Elections- Using Schools as a Channel to Further Corruption

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Source: Dieu Nalio Chery, Associated Press.

Article (re)defined by GT.

Summary:

With the second round of elections in Haiti under way, allegations of fraud and corruption continue to arise. This article from Haiti Sentinel reports on the Haitian Tet Kale Party, the current party of the Martelly presidential administration, deceiving parents and caretakers of school children into participating in a presidential campaign rally. Caretakers were under the assumption that they had to attend a mandatory school meeting to register for a social assistance program. Cases like this are further increasing the lack of faith in the entire political process currently taking place in Haiti.

Comments:

The Haiti Sentinel is a local newspaper in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti that reports on the current events taking place in the country. Unlike mainstream news outlets that report on Haiti in the United States, this newspaper shares stories of the everyday lived experiences of the local Haitian people. Continue reading

The Ugly Truth of the United States’ Post-Colonial Higher Education System- #ConcernedStudent1950

University of Missouri Turmoil

Source: Associated Press Photo/Jeff Roberson

“Time, promises, and token efforts to change won’t magically make the hate and ignorance that spawned the racial offenses at their schools disappear.”

 

Article (re)defined by GT.

Summary:

Recently, the president at the University of Missouri was forced to resigned after students took matters into their own hands to address the racial turmoil that was taking place on campus. What occurred at Mizzou was being mirrored nationwide, raising several questions and creating many realizations. The most important question  being–what solutions are there for colleges that flunk the Racism Test?

Comments:

A few weeks ago, I blogged about the Fees Must Fall movement in South Africa, where university students were protesting the potential hike in college fees and also raising the world’s consciousness about the ugly truths of the lack of racial diversity in South Africa’s higher education system. With all that has been going on recently here in America and with the purpose of this blog, I felt that it was justified to take some time and shed some light on our present circumstances. Continue reading

Fees Must Fall: “South Africa, by many measures, is the most unequal society in the world.”

South Africa Student protest tuition fee hikes. Source: CNN.

South Africa Student protest tuition fee hikes.
Source: CNN.

Article (re)defined by GT.

Summary:

The writers of this article discuss the recent Fees Must Fall movement that erupted in South Africa this past October. Students across university campuses and cities rose up against the South African government’s proposed 11.5% hike in tuition fees, which ultimately was successful when the government decided on a 0% increase. However, with continuing protests, the editors of this article highlight that the demands of the students are much deeper than preventing tuition fee increases. It’s more about the call for decolonizing higher education institutions and demanding the right to quality and accessible education for all.

Comments:

Basani Baloy and Gilad Isaacs are credible sources for this article because of their lived experiences within the South African higher educational system that they are critiquing. According to both of these editors, former South African university students and current PhD candidates at the University of London, the problem of racial inequality within the higher education system is hitting the black African population the most. Continue reading

Modernization in Haiti: A Review

nesmy manigat1

Nemsy Manigat, Minister of Education. Source: The Miami Herald.

Article (re)defined by GT.

“It’s become like an expired medication. It no longer works.”
– Nemsy Manigat, Haitian Minister of Education

Summary:

This article is about the new Haitian Minister of Education’s plan to modernize the education system. From changing policies on uniform attire to introducing a new mobile app that allows students to view their final exam results, Nesmy Manigat is working towards improving the quality of education for Haitian students. Despite the political and social climate surrounding the state of Haiti’s education system and the pushback that is occurring, Minister Manigat is determined that it is time for Haiti to move forward.

Comments:

The Haitian educational system is operating on a post-colonial model that has simply become out-of-date. Nemsy Manigat, who is Haiti’s 33rd Minister of Tourism in 33 years, faces the challenging task of reforming the education system to reflect the current needs of the nation. Some of the problems highlighted in this article are: school violence, particularly relating to uniforms being identifiers for targeting certain students; below average literacy rates; high cost for school fees and uniforms; lack of qualified teachers; high dropout rates and more. Although Jacqueline Charles, the reporter, does not explain the historical origins of these problems, one could hypothesize that there are several factors contributing to this situation.  Continue reading